Dangers of non sedating antihistamine

30-Dec-2017 14:41 by 8 Comments

Dangers of non sedating antihistamine - is shepard smith dating

A 1985 review of antihistamine pharmacokinetics found that the elimination half-life of diphenhydramine ranged between 3.4 and 9.3 hours across five studies, with a median elimination half-life of 4.3 hours. Analogues of diphenhydramine include orphenadrine, an anticholinergic, nefopam, an analgesic, and tofenacin, an antidepressant.The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine is also a close analogue of diphenhydramine.

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Several levels of evidence strongly indicate diphenhydramine (similar to chlorpheniramine ) can block the delayed rectifier potassium channel and, as a consequence, prolong the QT interval, leading to cardiac arrhythmias such as torsades de pointes. Like many other first-generation antihistamines, diphenhydramine is also a potent antimuscarinic (a competitive antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) and, as such, at high doses can cause anticholinergic syndrome.

The drug is an ingredient in several products sold as sleep aids, either alone or in combination with other ingredients such as acetaminophen (paracetamol). Diphenhydramine can cause minor psychological dependence. Topical diphenhydramine is sometimes used especially for people in hospice.

This use is without indication and topical diphenhydramine should not be used as treatment for nausea because research does not indicate this therapy is more effective than alternatives. This activity is responsible for the side effects of dry mouth and throat, increased heart rate, pupil dilation, urinary retention, constipation, and, at high doses, hallucinations or delirium.

Some new generation antihistamines may cause mild drowsiness especially after the first dose.

Ask your child's doctor whether these non-sedating antihistamines are appropriate for your child.

Several effective, easy-to-use medications are available to treat allergy symptoms.

Some are available by prescription; others, over-the-counter.

These are used to relieve itching, and have the advantage of causing fewer systemic effects (e.g., drowsiness) than oral forms.

Because of its sedative properties, diphenhydramine is widely used in nonprescription sleep aids for insomnia.

As with any medications, over-the-counter products should be used only with the advice of your child's doctor.

Antihistamines, the longest-established allergy medications, dampen the allergic reaction mainly by suppressing the effects of histamine (itching, swelling, and mucus production) in the tissues.

In contrast to older antihistamines, which tend to make people sleepy, decongestants taken by mouth can cause stimulation.